Vol. 8 No. 2 (2021)
Articles

Does Terms of Trade Matter for Economic Growth? A Focus on Natural Resource-Rich Sub-Saharan African Countries

Nzeh Innocent Chile
Department of Economics, Renaissance University, Ugbawka, Enugu State, Nigeria.
Benedict I Uzoechina
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.
Millicent Adanne Eze
School of Business and Social Sciences, Abertay University, Dundee, United Kingdom.
Chika P Imoagwu
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.
Ozoh Joan Nwamaka
Department of Economics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria.

Published 2021-12-08

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Keywords

  • Natural resources, GDP, Random effects, Fixed effects, Terms of trade, Labour force, FDI.

How to Cite

Chile, N. I., Uzoechina, B. I., Eze, M. A., Imoagwu, C. P., & Nwamaka, O. J. (2021). Does Terms of Trade Matter for Economic Growth? A Focus on Natural Resource-Rich Sub-Saharan African Countries. Economy, 8(2), 26–34. https://doi.org/10.20448/journal.502.2021.82.26.34

Abstract

The contention that deteriorating terms of trade exists in countries that rely heavily on the exploitation and export of natural resources motivated us in this study. We therefore sought to investigate the impact of terms of trade on economic growth in natural resource-rich sub-Saharan African countries. We carried out the study using annual series that span a period of 1990-2019 under the framework of panel Random and Fixed effects. Our findings indicate that a long run relationship exists between GDP and the explanatory variables used in the study. Results also show that, while cross-section random effects indicates that terms of trade positively impacts on GDP, period fixed effects shows that terms of trade negatively impacts on GDP even though it is not significant. Results of our study also show that in all the models, labour force total and FDI have positive impact on GDP, while trade openness impacts on GDP negatively. We therefore recommend that the SSA natural resource-rich countries should diversify their economies away from the traditional natural resources base. Also human capital should be improved through sound education and training, while all the bottlenecks that constrain the inflow of foreign direct investment should be dismantled.

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