Vol. 9 No. 4 (2022)
Articles

What’s on your Mind? Impact of Online Education on Students’ Mental Wellness

Joseph A Villarama
Central Luzon State University, Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines.
John Paul E Santos
Central Luzon State University, Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines.
Joseph P Adsuara
Central Luzon State University, Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines.
Jorri Anne Amethyst R Antalan
Central Luzon State University, Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines.
Jordan F Gundran
Central Luzon State University, Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines.

Published 2022-10-27

Statistics
0 Views | Downloads

Keywords

  • COVID-19 pandemic, Learning environment, Mental breakdowns, Mental wellness, Online education, Secondary students.

How to Cite

Villarama, J. A., Santos, J. P. E., Adsuara, J. P., Antalan, J. A. A. R., & Gundran, J. F. (2022). What’s on your Mind? Impact of Online Education on Students’ Mental Wellness. Journal of Education and E-Learning Research, 9(4), 240–248. https://doi.org/10.20448/jeelr.v9i4.4243

Abstract

Due to the pandemic, institutions shifted online and away from in-person classes. Online education implementation and integration require adjustments and pedagogical skills. Overcoming social-distance protocols and ensuring education continues is one side. How students adapt needs more study. Stable internet and devices and hours in front of computers require careful consideration. Using a 4-point Likert scale and a self-made validated questionnaire on factors affecting mental wellness, with a reported internal consistency of 0.73, the present study differentiated mental wellness of respondents in terms of their age and sex through ANOVA, and identified factors affecting mental wellness of 100 online Filipino students, evaluated through percentage, mean, and SD, who participated in this mixed method study, which combined quantitative and qualitative research design. Most disagreed with and viewed online education as more difficult than in-person, which had significant effects on their mental wellness, from losing motivation to work on tasks to feeling less effective in lessons. Some had mental breakdowns, anxiety, and considered dropping out. Online education is a possible solution to continue learning until normalcy returns, but questionable in countries where thousands of households lack a stable internet connection and means to buy online education gadgets. Policymakers must create a positive education landscape considering everyone’s welfare while educators are enjoined to innovate.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.